Fort Worth Magazine November 2010 : Page 20

fwbeat:culture your map to the arts » by Jennifer casseday-Blair You began your appreciation for music at a very early age. What shaped your career in music and ultimately led you to this position in Fort Worth? Our home was filled with music. Everyone in my family played at least one instrument, but Mom was the professional. Back in those days, she would teach group piano classes down in the base-ment. At around the age of 4 or 5, I would sit at the top of the stairs and listen in. Then I would ask my mom if she would teach me. My life has always been surrounded by music. It has been the one constant in my life and piano was my first love. After 20 years in orchestras, it is a huge honor to return to the piano with such a prestigious organization. Facing the Music David Chambless Worters — Incoming Van Cliburn Foundation President & CEO After 11 years as president and CEO of the North Carolina Symphony, David Chambless Worters has accepted an invita-tion to become president and CEO of the Van Cliburn Foun-dation. In addition to being the home of the quadrennial Van Cliburn International Piano Competition, the Foundation also hosts the highly acclaimed Cliburn Concerts series in North Texas and the International Piano Competition for Outstanding Amateurs. It seems that after an international search for the right person for the position, the Foundation has made a brilliant choice. Worters will be attending the Vladimir Felts-man performance at Bass Performance Hall on Nov. 16 for a meet and greet with Cliburn patrons and supporters. 20 fwtx.com Beginning in December, you will assume your duties as president and chief executive officer of the Founda-tion. What will be some of your first orders of business? That’s easy. There are so many people that I need to meet and make connections with. The board, donors, the audience, volunteers, business and commu-nity leaders, current and former winners, the media, elected officials. All of these people are so critical in making the Van Cliburn Founda-tion successful. Aside from immersing myself in the com-munity, we will be planning the amateur com-petition and only a month or two away from announcing the 2011-2012 Van Cliburn Con-cert Series. What are some of your plans for expanding the Foundation’s reach into the North Texas community and the arts community worldwide? It is very important to me that we enhance the vis-ibility of the Foundation throughout the local and worldwide community. The Van Cliburn Foundation is not just about a competition, but about the role that the arts play in our lives, whether that be for quality of life, economic development or music education for children. The arts need advocates. I want to see the Foundation serve as not only a voice for the arts but as one of Fort Worth’s most essential calling cards to the world.

Arts and Culture

Jennifer Casseday-Blair

<b>Facing the Music </b><br /> <br /> David Chambless Worters — Incoming Van Cliburn Foundation President & CEO<br /> <br /> After 11 years as president and CEO of the North Carolina Symphony, David Chambless Worters has accepted an invitation to become president and CEO of the Van Cliburn Foundation.<br /> <br /> In addition to being the home of the quadrennial Van Cliburn International Piano Competition, the Foundation also hosts the highly acclaimed Cliburn Concerts series in North Texas and the International Piano Competition for Outstanding Amateurs. It seems that after an international search for the right person for the position, the Foundation has made a brilliant choice. Worters will be attending the Vladimir Feltsman performance at Bass Performance Hall on Nov. 16 for a meet and greet with Cliburn patrons and supporters.<br /> <br /> <b>You began your appreciation for music at a very early age. What shaped your career in music and ultimately led you to this position in Fort Worth? </b>Our home was filled with music. Everyone in my family played at least one instrument, but Mom was the professional. Back in those days, she would teach group piano classes down in the basement. At around the age of 4 or 5, I would sit at the top of the stairs and listen in. Then I would ask my mom if she would teach me.<br /> <br /> My life has always been surrounded by music. It has been the one constant in my life and piano was my first love. After 20 years in orchestras, it is a huge honor to return to the piano with such a prestigious organization.<br /> <br /> <b>Beginning in December, you will assume your duties as president and chief executive officer of the Foundation. What will be some of your first orders of business? </b>That’s easy. There are so many people that I need to meet and make connections with. The board, donors, the audience, volunteers, business and community leaders, current and former winners, the media, elected officials. All of these people are so critical in making the Van Cliburn Foundation successful.<br /> <br /> Aside from immersing myself in the community, we will be planning the amateur competition and only a month or two away from announcing the 2011-2012 Van Cliburn Concert Series.<br /> <br /> <b>What are some of your plans for expanding the Foundation’s reach into the North Texas community and the arts community worldwide? </b>It is very important to me that we enhance the visibility of the Foundation throughout the local and worldwide community. The Van Cliburn Foundation is not just about a competition, but about the role that the arts play in our lives, whether that be for quality of life, economic development or music education for children. The arts need advocates.<br /> <br /> I want to see the Foundation serve as not only a voice for the arts but as one of Fort Worth’s most essential calling cards to the world.<br /> <br /> <b>Continued Suspicion</b><br /> <br /> Few believe that Lee Harvey Oswald acted alone in the assassination of President John F. Kennedy. Fewer still have any idea who else might have been involved. Who should have been, or should be, suspects?<br /> <br /> It’s arguably the most controversial case in modern history.<br /> <br /> A new historical fiction novel, The Scrapbook Lecture…a collection of suspects, by Gary B. Haley, takes a fresh approach to learning about a part of history that is still fresh on the minds of many Americans. While the assassination has been written about extensively, Haley covers events and slices of time that have rarely been told and never all in one reading.<br /> <br /> Based on 28 years of research, the novel's perspective allows the reader to go back in time and experience the frustration and anger that many people felt as they dealt with the Kennedy family. Haley briefly revisits the early 20th century, cleverly tying all the individual stories together with the aid of two minor fictional characters.<br /> <br /> The narrator of the story is a history professor. He bases his lecture on a scrapbook that had been compiled over several decades by a mysterious woman in Boston.<br /> <br /> The professor is described ambiguously enough for readers to imagine him being a favorite teacher from their own past. The mysterious woman from Boston could represent any of the women who were charmed by Kennedy’s looks and power.<br /> <br /> A scene in the story explains the roots of the author's interest in the JFK assassination. You'll know it when you read it.<br /> <br /> Haley says that of all the documents and fact snippets accumulated for the book, (an estimated 1.3 million words), very little of it actually focused on accumulating a list of suspects.<br /> <br /> “Most of the research done in the past concentrated on one suspect or another, trying to prove or disprove their involvement,” he said.<br /> <br /> Somewhere between 60 and 90 percent of all Americans, depending on which survey you believe, believe that Oswald did not act alone, yet very few of those people can name anyone else who might have been involved, Haley says. “Some know to mention Marcello, others guess Ruby or LBJ, but most have no idea,” he said.<br /> <br /> The Scrapbook Lecture, which is more like an adventure story than a history lesson, summarizes a list of suspects in a compelling storyline that makes it difficult to put down.

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